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How To Control Dogwooddogwood control

There are a number of invasive trees which at first they are wanted but once homeowner and landscapers see how out of control and unruly they get, they want them gone. This can certainly be the case with a species of tree and shrub known as dogwood. To some, these trees are seen as ornamentals and can be nice to have in the backyard, however because of their invasive nature and ability to spread wildly, these trees and shrubs can quickly overtake a land where they are established, creating an eyesore and hindering progress of other plants it competes with in the same vicinity.

Dogwood (Cornus spp.) is the common name for a group of about 45 species of small trees and shrubs which grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 2 through 9, depending on the species. These plants have been around for generations in the United States and  Many dogwoods grow to heights of up to 15 feet, and they are often grown for their beautiful flowers, bracts and leaf color during autumn. Dogwoods are able to spread and reproduce through suckers, which makes the prevention of the shoots quite difficult.

As nice looking as dogwood is, a homeowner may be fine with one, not a bunch. Growing a dogwood tree can result in numerous dogwood shrubs emerging from the soil and out-competing other plant life, soaking up most of the nutrition and preventing other plants from thriving.  

If you have dogwood growing on your land and want it gone, Solutions Pest and Lawn can assist you via top-grade control products and providing helpful how-to advice so you could safely and confidently do it yourself.

How To Control Dogwood: 4 Step Solution

Dogwood trees and shrubs are not the easiest to get rid of. Because of it’s invasive nature, there is a likely chance that even with applying control measures, dogwood can re-emerge. With that being said, we want to make it clear that treatment of dogwood trees is not a one and done job.  These plants are persistent and will resist and not go away easily. However, with the right chemical control approach, you can eliminate them. Here are the steps we suggest to get rid of this plant:

Step 1: The first step is to identify the plant to be sure that you are indeed dealing with a dogwood tree and not some other species of tree.  If you are not totally sure, you can always shoot us an email at identification@solutionsstores.com containing a photo of the plant in question and we will ID it properly for you as well as provide control recommendations.

Step 2: Start with preparing your equipment. We recommend using a pump-up sprayer or a backpack sprayer depending on the number of trees you are dealing with. Sprayers mounted on ATV vehicles also work well. There are a number of good herbicides Make sure to follow the directions on the label closely for the exact details on application rates. We also recommend adding a spray marking dye, to mark plants that have been sprayed and to tell if you are getting an sufficient amount of herbicide on the plant.

Step 3: Next you can proceed with treatment. First start by cutting the shrubbery or tree down to ground level. Then apply herbicide to the stump, making sure to coat it completely and evenly. This is not a one-time job and you may need conduct follow up applications until the plant has fully died.

Browse our dogwood treatment products below. If you ever have any questions, reach out to us and we will be happy to assist you. You can reach us via phone, email or online live chat.

 

HOW TO CONTROL DOGWOOD: 4 STEP SOLUTIONS

Dogwood trees and shrubs are not the easiest to get rid of. Because of it’s invasive nature, there is a likely chance that even with applying control measures, dogwood can re-emerge. With that being said, we want to make it clear that treatment of dogwood trees is not a one and done job.  These plants are persistent and will resist and not go away easily. However, with the right chemical control approach, you can eliminate them. Here are the steps we suggest to get rid of this plant:

 

Step 1: Identification - The first step is to identify the plant to be sure that you are indeed dealing with a dogwood tree and not some other species of tree.


The identifying characteristics of dogwood are leaves with an angled oval shape and visible veins running toward the edges. These leaves will change colors as the seasons change , gradually turning from green to red. Dogwood tree bark is scaly and can easily be peeled off of a tree piece by piece. Dogwood is also distinguished by its flowers, a four petaled leaf that is usually white or pink found on the branches of the trees near the leaves. Finally, dogwood is known to bear fruit that resemble red grapes which grow on cluster on branches. Some species are edible while others may be toxic.

 

If you are not totally sure if you have dogwood, you can always shoot us an email at identification@solutionsstores.com containing a photo of the plant in question and we will ID it properly for you as well as provide control recommendations.

Step 2: Inspection - In this phase, you will need to analyze the area to see how severe of a dogwood tree problem you have. Dogwood grows best in moist soils, but will grow in drier habitats as well. They like to grow in the shade of larger trees as understory plants. This is important to know so you can do a bit of habitat modification to create a less conducive environment for plant growth.

 

Step 3: Control - Start with preparing your equipment. We recommend using a pump-up sprayer or a backpack sprayer depending on the number of trees you are dealing with. Sprayers mounted on ATV vehicles also work well. There are a number of good herbicides we have in stock.


Make sure to follow the directions on the label closely for the exact details on application rates. We also recommend adding a spray marking dye, to mark plants that have been sprayed and to tell if you are getting an sufficient amount of herbicide on the plant.

 

Next you can proceed with the treatment. First start by cutting the shrubbery or tree down to ground level. Then apply herbicide to the stump, making sure to coat it completely and evenly. This is not a one-time job and you may need conduct follow up applications until the plant has fully died.

 

Step 4: Prevention - As mentioned in step 2, we mentioned conducting some habitat modification after dogwood has been controlled to ensure the plant doesn’t regrow or make a comeback.

 

Learn More About Dogwood

Dogwood (such as gray dogwood) is a native shrub that is commonly found in many woodland and pasture areas. Eradication of this plant is not an easy task. Landowners who are concerned by the invasiveness of dogwood on a particular area should gauge whether it is worth the battle to eliminate the shrub and determine how big of an issue they have on their hands before proceeding with a program of control. Knowing a little bit about this shrub will also help to make informed decisions regarding the need for control.


Invasive dogwood has shown to be a nuisance in prairies and other pasturelands because its growth crowds out other native grasses and vegetation  In the western U.S., this shrub has invaded former river channels, thus reducing the channel area following water diversions.


Control Options

While we would recommend chemical treatment over other options, here we will cover all the options you have at your disposal for treat dogwoood. There are three main methods of controlling this tree: burning, mechanical control (cutting), or herbicide treatments.

 

Gray dogwood is a native shrub that is a natural component of many woodland and prairie communities. Eradication of this plant is not practical nor desirable. Managers who are concerned by the abundance of gray dogwood on a particular managed area should determine the desired abundance of the shrub on the site before setting goals for control. A sequence of historical aerial photos can be helpful in confirming or refuting the belief that this shrub is increasing coverage at the expense of prairie ground cover on a given site. Knowledge of appropriate levels of shrub cover will allow informed decisions regarding the need for control.

By crowding out native prairie grasses and forbs, gray dogwood can reduce the habitat available for a prairie ground cover. In Missouri, gray dogwood is considered a problem in remnant loess hill prairies of the northwest because it reduces the size of these already diminished communities. In the western U.S., this shrub has invaded former river channels, thus reducing the channel area following water diversions.


CONTROL RECOMMENDATIONS

Control measures may enlist one or more of the following techniques: prescribed burning, cutting, or herbicide treatments. No biological controls are known. Although grazing is used in the management of some Missouri prairies, it is not felt to significantly affect the growth of gray dogwood.

  • Prescribed burning: While this may be a quick and less costly method of control, it may not be totally effective in keeping dogwood under control. Dogwood is likely to re-emerge following burning there plant because a thorough enough job wasn’t done or there isn’t enough fuel to fully burn the plant. The other con is the burning could be potentially dangerous and carries the risk of spreading the fire if the proper precautions are not taken.; Fire is more effective when combined with cutting and/or herbicide treatments.

  • Cutting: Cutting at least two times during a growing season combined with burning after re-sprouting will greatly weaken dogwood. A combination of cutting and herbicide application followed by burning the following spring (after bud break) has reportedly been a successful method of control. After a stand has been reduced to an acceptable level, cutting and burning alone should maintain the desired level of abundance.

  • Chemical control: As cut stem treatments, both glyphosate (Roundup) and triclopyr have proven effective. A 10- to 20-percent solution in water of either chemical can be painted on stems immediately following cutting during the summer. The higher concentration may be necessary for the larger stems. Mowing of shrubs with a later foliar application of a 1.5-percent solution of glyphosate resulted in 100-percent control of the related rough-leaved dogwood.


Over all these methods, we highly recommend chemical control via utilizing our listed chemical herbicide suggestions. Chemical control works best because of their relatively low toxicities, lack of persistence in soils, and effectiveness in dogwood control. However, herbicides may only be applied according to label directions so make sure to follow them.

 

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